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Shadow Secretary of State for Northern Ireland

The Shadow Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is a member of the British Shadow Cabinet responsible for the scrutiny of the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and their department, the Northern Ireland Office. The post is currently held ...

Commander-in-Chief, Ireland

Commander-in-Chief, Ireland was title of the commander of the British forces in Ireland before 1922. Until the Act of Union in 1800, the position involved command of the distinct Irish Army of the Kingdom of Ireland.

Lord High Constable of Ireland

The office of Lord High Constable of Ireland was used during coronations of the monarch of the United Kingdom after the Acts of Union 1800. The office was abolished after the creation of the Irish Free State in 1922.

Chief governor of Ireland

The chief governor was the senior official in the Dublin Castle administration, which maintained English and British rule in Ireland from the 1170s to 1922. The chief governor was the viceroy of the English monarch and presided over the Privy Cou ...

Chief Secretary for Ireland

The Chief Secretary for Ireland was a key political office in the British administration in Ireland. Nominally subordinate to the Lord Lieutenant, and officially the "Chief Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant", from the early 19th century until the ...

List of Irish constituencies

The following list identifies every constituency used in Parliamentary etc. elections in Ireland. The list consists of index names for the seat and to identify what is potentially to be covered in a single constituency article. The index name, wh ...

Mughal emperors

The Mughal Emperors, built and ruled the Mughal Empire on the Indian subcontinent, mainly corresponding to the modern countries of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh. The Mughals began to rule parts of India from 1526, and by 1700 ruled ...

History of Aurangzib

History of Aurangzib is a book in five volumes by Bengali historian Jadunath Sarkar about the Mughal ruler Aurangzeb. The book is considered to be the magnum opus of Jadunath Sarkar and was written between 1912 and 1924. It has been called the mo ...

Hazinedar

Hazinedar or Haznadar is a title in Ottoman Empire hierarchy. Depending of the suffix or prefix it had different meanings. The English language translation of the word is a treasurer.

Bas Kadın

Ottoman court or the culture that evolved around the court of the Ottoman Empire was known as the "Ottoman Way". To get a high position in the empire, one must have been skilled in the Way. It included both knowing Persian, Arabic and Ottoman Tur ...

Enderûn

Enderûn was the term used in the Ottoman Empire to designate the "Interior Service" of the Imperial Court, concerned with the private service of the Ottoman Sultans, as opposed to the state-administrative "Exterior Service". Its name derives from ...

1455 defter of the Brankovic lands

The Ottoman cadastral tax census of 1455 in the Brankovic lands recorded: 13.693 adult males, 14.087 household heads 480 widows and 13.607 adult males. 480 villages, 12.985 dwellings, Yugoslav and Serbian scholars have researched the defter, conc ...

Halime Hatun

Her origins are unknown; she is variously referred to as "Hayme Ana" and "Khaimah" in later mentions, and is not mentioned by name at all in the earliest Ottoman histories written in the 15th century. Hayme Ana is also a traditional name of Ertuğ ...

Hayme Hatun

Hayme Hatun, also known as Hayme Ana, was the grandmother of Osman I, founder of the Ottoman Empire and the mother of Ertuğrul Gazi, the leader of the Kayı clan of the Oghuz Turks.

Humasah Sultan (daughter of Sehzade Mehmed)

Humasah Sultan was an Ottoman princess, the daughter of Sehzade Mehmed and the granddaughter of Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent of the Ottoman Empire, and his favourite consort and legal wife Hurrem Sultan.

Sehzade

Sehzade is the Turkish form of the Persian title Shahzade, and refers to the male descendants of an Ottoman sovereign in the male line. This title is equivalent to "prince of the blood imperial" in English.

Sultan Hatun

Sultan Hatun was a Turkish princess, the daughter of Isfendiyar Bey, eighth ruler of the Isfendiyarids. She was the wife of Sultan Murad II of the Ottoman Empire.

Agha of the Janissaries

The Agha of the Janissaries or Janissary Agha was a top Ottoman military official and courtier, and the commander of the Janissary corps. Apart from the commander-general of the entire corps, the title of "Agha of the Janissaries" was also be bor ...

Çavus

Çavus, also anglicized Chaush and Chiaus, Arabic shawish, شاويش, was an Ottoman title used for two separate soldier professions, both acting as messengers although differing in levels. It was a rank below agha and kethuda, in units such as the Ja ...

Damat

Damat "bridegroom") was an official Ottoman title describing men that entered the imperial House of Osman by means of marriage, literally becoming the bridegroom to the Ottoman sultan and the dynasty. In almost all cases, this occurred when a man ...

Dizdar

Dizdar was the title given in the Ottoman Empire to a castle warden or fortress commander, appointed to manage troops and keep the fortress in its role as a defence point. The word is of Persian origin, meaning gatekeeper, watchman, guardsman or ...

Ikbal (title)

Ikbal was the title given to the imperial consort of the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, who came below the rank of Kadın. The Sultans usually had three, four and six Ikbals, and four, five Gozdes with the title of Ikbal. The Ikbals were the women ...

Kalfa

Kalfa was a general term in the Ottoman Empire for the women attendants and supervisors in service in the imperial palace. Novice girls had to await promotion to the rank of kalfa. It was a rank below that of usta, the title of the leading admini ...

Kethuda

Kethuda, often corrupted to kahya or kehya in daily speech, was an Ottoman Turkish title meaning "steward, deputy, lieutenant". It derives from the Persian word katak-khvatai. The term originated in medieval Persia. Under the Ilkhanids, the term ...

Mirmiran

Mirmiran the military title of the Ottoman Pasha, similar to the title of Beylerbey, the ruler of Eyalet. Initially, the title was assigned to two pashas: the ruler of Kyustendil - Mirmiran Rumelia; to the ruler of Erzurum - Mirmiran of Anatolia; ...

Sultan of Sultans

Sultan of Sultans is the literal English translation of the Ottoman Turkish royal title Sultānus-Selātīn. But this title was firstly used by Sultan of Delhi Sultanate in Persian context. As with various other laudatory titles of Semitic origin, s ...

Uch bey

An uç bey or uch bey was the title given to semi-autonomous warrior chieftains during the Rise of the Ottoman Empire. As leaders of akinji warrior bands, they played a leading role during the conquests of the Byzantine Empire and the Balkans. The ...

Shahin Dino

Shahin Dino was an Albanian politician and diplomat in the Ottoman Empire and independent Albania. He was born in Preveza in modern Greece during the 19th century to the notable local Dino family. In 1897 he was one of the local volunteer irregul ...

Rauf Pasha

Mehmed Rauf Pasha bin Abdi Pasha, Ottoman soldier and statesman of Circassian origin. As a child, he took lessons from private tutors. In his youth he was assigned to the Sublime Porte and soon became an officer. In 1849, at the rank of lieutenan ...

Shaykh al-Islām

Shaykh al-Islām was used in the classical era as an honorific title for outstanding scholars of the Islamic sciences. It first emerged in Khurasan towards the end of the 4th Islamic century. In the central and western lands of Islam, it was an in ...

Vassal and tributary states of the Ottoman Empire

Vassal States were a number of tributary or vassal states, usually on the periphery of the Ottoman Empire under suzerainty of the Porte, over which direct control was not established, for various reasons.

Ottoman Ukraine

Ottoman Ukraine / Khan Ukraine is an historical term for right-bank Ukraine also known after its Turkic name Yedisan. The first mentioned records are traced to 1737 when the Russian secret agent Lupul was urging to attack the Ottoman Ukraine.

Short-lived Ottoman provinces

Among the many Ottoman provinces that were created during the centuries-long history of the Ottoman Empire, some existed for relatively short amounts of time, either because they were ceded to foreign powers, obtained independence, or were simply ...

Vilayet

A vilayet was a first-order administrative division, or province of the later Ottoman Empire, introduced with the promulgation of the Vilayet Law of 21 January 1867. The reform was part of the ongoing administrative reforms that were being enacte ...

Yıldız Hamidiye Mosque

The Yıldız Hamidiye Mosque, also called the Yıldız Mosque, is an Ottoman imperial mosque located in Yıldız neighbourhood of Besiktas district in Istanbul, Turkey, on the way to Yıldız Palace. The mosque was commissioned by the Ottoman sultan Abdu ...

Oenanthe of Egypt

Oenanthe was an Egyptian Greek noblewoman and through marriage was a relation of the Ptolemaic dynasty. Oenanthe was a woman of obscure origins. She had married at an unknown date Agathocles an Egyptian Greek nobleman, the grandson of Agathocles ...

Alexandrian Pleiad

The Alexandrian Pleiad is the name given to a group of seven Alexandrian poets and tragedians in the 3rd century BC working in the court of Ptolemy II Philadelphus. The name derives from the seven stars of the Pleiades star cluster. There are sev ...

Posidippus (epigrammatic poet)

Posidippus was born in the city of Pella, capital of the kingdom of Macedon as the son of Admetos. He lived for some time in Samos before moving permanently to the court of Ptolemy I Soter and later Ptolemy II Philadelphus in Alexandria, Egypt. A ...

Apollonius (dioiketes)

Apollonius was the dioiketes or chief finance minister of Egypt during the reign of Ptolemy II Philadelphus. Little is known about his personal life; in ancient documents, he is called simply "Apollonius the dioiketes without recording his home c ...

Constitution of the Roman Kingdom

The Constitution of the Roman Kingdom was an unwritten set of guidelines and principles originating mainly through precedent. During the years of the Roman Kingdom, the constitutional arrangement was centered on the king, who had the power to app ...

History of the Constitution of the Roman Kingdom

The History of the Constitution of the Roman Kingdom is a study of the ancient Roman Kingdom that traces the progression of Roman political development from the founding of the city of Rome in 753 BC to the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom in 510 B ...

Mamilian commission

The Mamilian commission was established by Gaius Mamilius in 109 BC for the investigation of corruption and treason. Its jurors were pulled from the equestrian class, rather than the Senatorial class, launching an assault against corruption in th ...

Publius Autronius Paetus

Publius Autronius Paetus was a politician of the late Roman Republic who was involved in the conspiracy of Catiline. He was elected consul in 66 BC to serve in 65 BC, alongside Publius Cornelius Sulla, but before they could take office both were ...

Quintus Dellius

Quintus Dellius was a Roman commander and politician in the second half of the 1st century BC. His family was of equestrian rank in the Roman social system of status.

Aulus Didius Gallus Fabricius Veiento

Aulus Didius Gallus Fabricius Veiento was a Roman senator who played a major role in the courts of several Roman emperors during the first century AD. For his usefulness, Veiento was rewarded with the office of suffect consul three times. Modern ...

Lucius Junius Quintus Vibius Crispus

Lucius Junius Quintus Vibius Crispus, sometimes known as Quintus Vibius Crispus, was a Roman senator and amici or companion of the Emperors, known for his wit. He was a three-time suffect consul.

Lucius Sergius Fidenas

Lucius Sergius Fidenas was a Roman politician during the 5th century BC, and was elected consul in 437 and 429 BC. In 433, 424, and 418 BC he was military tribune with consular power.

Mamurra

A letter of Cicero of 45 BC refers to Caesar giving no visible reaction when he heard news of Mamurra, which has been interpreted by some as referring to his death, although the reference is too ambiguous to be certain.

Marcus Valerius Maximus Lactuca

He is a member of the Valerius Maximus, patrician branch of the Valeria people. He is one of the grandchildren of Volusus Valerius and the son of Manius Valerius Volusus Maximus. His full name is Marcus Valerius M.f. Volusi n. Maximus Lactuca.

Gaius Oppius

Gaius Oppius was an intimate friend of Julius Caesar. He managed the dictators private affairs during his absence from Rome, and, together with Lucius Cornelius Balbus, exercised considerable influence in the city. It was reported that Oppius din ...