Blog page 259

River Fleet

The River Fleet is the largest of Londons subterranean rivers. Its headwaters are two streams on Hampstead Heath, each of which was dammed into a series of ponds - the Hampstead Ponds and the Highgate Ponds - in the 18th century. At the southern ...

Puddle Dock

Puddle Dock is a street in Blackfriars in the City of London. It was once the site of one of Londons docks, and was later the site of the Mermaid Theatre. The dock was filled in during redevelopment in the 1960s and 1970s.

Whitefriars, London

Whitefriars is an area in the Ward of Farringdon Without in the City of London. Until 1540, it was the site of a Carmelite monastery, from which it gets its name.

Bermondsey tanners

"The Master, Wardens and Comonalty of the Art or Mistery of Tanners of the Parish of St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey of Surrey" was incorporated by Royal Charter by Queen Anne on 15 July 1703. Its authority was to check on the quality of tanning with ...

Blackwell Hall

Blackwell Hall in the City of London was the centre for the wool and cloth trade in England from mediaeval times until the 19th century. Cloth manufacturers and clothiers from provincial England brought their material to Blackwell Hall to display ...

Charterhouse Square

Charterhouse Square is a garden square, a pentagonal space, in Smithfield, central London and is the largest courtyard or yard associated with the London Charterhouse, mostly formed of Tudor and Stuart architecture restored after the London Blitz ...

Cheapside

Cheapside is a street in the City of London, the historic and modern financial centre of London, which forms part of the A40 London to Fishguard road. It links St. Martins Le Grand with Poultry. Near its eastern end at Bank junction, where it bec ...

Ermine Street

Ermine Street is the name of a major Roman road in England that ran from London to Lincoln and York. The Old English name was "Earninga Straete", named after a tribe called the Earningas, who inhabited a district later known as Armingford Hundred ...

Great Conduit

The Great Conduit was a man-made underground channel in London, England, which brought drinking water from the Tyburn to Cheapside in the City. In 1237 the City of London acquired the springs near the Tyburn and built a reservoir to provide a hea ...

Gresham Club

The Gresham Club was a gentlemens club in the City of London founded in 1843 and dissolved in 1991. It was re-established in April 2018. It was named after Thomas Gresham and its last site was located on Abchurch Lane off King William Street.

Guildable Manor

Guildable Manor is a Court Leet in Southwark under the authority of the City of London, along with the Kings Manor, Southwark, and the Great Liberty. The name of Guildable first recorded in 1377 refers to the collection of taxes there and was ado ...

Hanging Sword Alley

The alley was first known as Ouldwood Alley in the 16th century, when it was in the manor of the Bishop of Salisbury, who owned twenty-four tenements there. It was then named after the sign of a fencing school recorded in 1564, and tuition in thi ...

Kings Manor, Southwark

The Kings Manor - formally The City of London’s Kings Manor of the Town and Borough of Southwark - is an institution of the City of London which is not a Livery Company as it is territorially rather than trade based, being the organisation of the ...

Knighten Guilde

The Knighten Guilde, also known as Portsoken Ward, was an obscure Medieval guild of the City of London, according to A Survey of London by John Stow in origin an order of chivalry founded by Saxon King Edgar for loyal knights. Outside of Stow, it ...

Little Britain, London

Little Britain is a street in the City of London running from St. Martins Le Grand in the east to West Smithfield in the west. It forms the northern boundary of St Bartholomews Hospital and is situated in the Aldersgate and Farringdon Within ward ...

Lloyds Coffee House

Lloyds Coffee House was a significant meeting place in London in the 17th and 18th centuries. It was opened by Edward Lloyd c. 1648–15 February 1713 on Tower Street in 1686. The establishment was a popular place for sailors, merchants and shipown ...

London House, Aldersgate Street

London House was the London mansion of the Bishop of London after the restoration of the monarchy in 1660. Today the site, 172 Aldersgate Street is occupied by a block of flats.

Oat Lane

Oat Lane is a short street in the ward of Bassishaw in the City of London. First mentioned by Leake in 1666, it runs from Noble Street to Staining Lane between Gresham Street and London Wall. The Great Hall of the Worshipful Company of Pewterers ...

Old Billingsgate Market

Old Billingsgate Market is the name given to what is now a hospitality and events venue in the City of London, based in the Victorian building that was originally Billingsgate Fish Market, the worlds largest fish market in the 19th century. The f ...

Paternoster Row

Paternoster Row was a street in the City of London that was a centre of the London publishing trade, with booksellers operating from the street. Paternoster Row was described as "almost synonymous" with the book trade. It was part of an area also ...

Queen Street, London

Queen Street is a street in the City of London which runs between Upper Thames Street at its southern end to Cheapside in the north. The thoroughfares of Queen Street and King Street were newly laid out, cutting across more ancient routes in the ...

St. Martins Le Grand

St. Martins Le Grand is a former parish and liberty within the City of London, and is the name of a one-way street north of Newgate Street and Cheapside and south of Aldersgate Street. It forms the southernmost section of the A1 road.

St Andrew Holborn (parish)

St Andrew Holborn was an ancient English parish that until 1767 was partly in the City of London and mainly in the county of Middlesex. Its City, thus southern, part retained its former name or was sometimes officially referred to as St Andrew Ho ...

St Sepulchre (parish)

St Sepulchre was an ancient parish partly within the City of London and partly within Middlesex, England. For civil purposes it was divided into two civil parishes, each called St Sepulchre, although the parish in the City of London was also know ...

FTSE AIM 100 Index

The FTSE AIM UK 100 Index was introduced on 16 May 2005, and is a market-capitalisation-weighted stock market index. The index incorporates the largest 50 companies which have their primary listing on the Alternative Investment Market. It include ...

FTSE Russell

FTSE Russell is the trading name of London Stock Exchange Group subsidiaries FTSE International Limited and Frank Russell Company. The division is notable for FTSE 100 Index, Russell 2000 Index as well as other indices. The brand and division FTS ...

Jonathans Coffee-House

Jonathans Coffee-House was a significant meeting place in London in the 17th and 18th centuries, famous as the original site of the London Stock Exchange. The coffee house was opened around 1680 by Jonathan Miles in Change or Exchange Alley, in t ...

E postcode area

The E postcode area, also known as the London E postcode area, is the part of the London post town covering much of the east of Greater London, England as well as Sewardstone, Essex. It borders the N postcode area to the west, equally north of th ...

EC postcode area

The EC postcode area, also known as the London EC postal area, is a group of postcode districts in central London, England. It includes almost all of the City of London and parts of the London Boroughs of Islington, Camden, Hackney, Tower Hamlets ...

WC postcode area

The WC postcode area, also known as the London WC postcode area, is a group of postcode districts in central London, England. The area covered is of high density development, and includes parts of the City of Westminster and the London Boroughs o ...

Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisations

ACEVO is a membership body for the leaders of third sector organisations in England and Wales. ACEVO has sister organisations in Scotland and Northern Ireland (CO3 Chief Officers 3rd Sector.

Asthma UK

The Asthma Research Council was started in 1927. At that time the annual income was between £1.000 and £4.000 a year. One of the first donations was used to pay for special asthma clinics at Guys Hospital and Great Ormond Street Hospital. In 1989 ...

Aviation Environment Federation

The Aviation Environment Federation is the principal UK non-profit making organisation concerned with the environmental effects of aviation. These range from aviation noise issues associated with small airstrips or helipads to the contribution of ...

British Contact Lens Association

The British Contact Lens Association is an educational and scientific membership organisation formed in 1977. In 2013 it had 2000 members. It organises an annual Clinical Conference and Exhibition. In 2015 the main themes were myopia management a ...

The Brokerage Citylink

The Brokerage Citylink is a charitable organization based in the City of London. It is also referred to as The Brokerage for short. The Brokerage is registered charity number 1059173, founded in 1996. The Brokerage works to increase the number of ...

Child & Co.

Child & Co. is a private, formerly independent bank that is now owned by The Royal Bank of Scotland Group. The Royal Bank of Scotland incorporating Child & Co., Bankers is based at 1 Fleet Street on the western edge of the City of London, beside ...

City of London Club

The City of London Club was established in 1832 and is the oldest of the gentlemens clubs based in the City of London. Its Italian Palladian-style building was designed by English architect Philip Hardwick. Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, is it ...

Fuller, Banbury, Nix & Co

Fuller, Banbury, Nix & Co was a British private bank based in the City of London. It was founded in 1737 in Lombard Street, London and operated under a succession of names reflecting its different partners until receiving its final name in 1881. ...

National Lottery Community Fund

The National Lottery Community Fund, legally named the Big Lottery Fund, is a non-departmental public body responsible for distributing funds raised by the National Lottery for "good causes". Since 2004 it has awarded over £6 billion to more than ...

Orthodontic Technicians Association

In 1971 orthodontic technicians based at London teaching hospitals began holding meetings to discuss the regulation of orthodontic technology and the ways in which standards in the profession could be improved. Bert Aldridge, laboratory manager a ...

Ashtead Common

Ashtead Common is a wooded area to the north of the village of Ashtead in England which is open to the public. It is owned and managed by the City of London Corporation. 180.5 ha of the common are a National Nature Reserve. Together with Epsom Co ...

Bunhill Fields

Bunhill Fields is a former burial ground in central London, in the London Borough of Islington, just north of the City of London. What remains is about 1.6 hectares in extent and the bulk of the site is a public garden upkept by the City of Londo ...

Burnham Beeches

Burnham Beeches is a 374.6 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest situated west of Farnham Common in the village of Burnham, Buckinghamshire. The southern half is owned by the Corporation of London and is open to the public. It is ...

City of London Cemetery and Crematorium

The City of London Cemetery and Crematorium is a cemetery and crematorium in the east of London. It is owned and operated by the City of London Corporation. It is designated Grade I on the Historic England National Register of Historic Parks and ...

Highgate Wood

Highgate Wood is a 28 hectare area of ancient woodland in North London, lying between East Finchley, Highgate Village, and Muswell Hill. It was originally part of the ancient Forest of Middlesex which covered much of London, Hertfordshire and Ess ...

St Mary Aldermanbury

St. Mary Aldermanbury was a church in the City of London first mentioned in 1181 and destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rebuilt in Portland stone by Christopher Wren, it was again gutted by the Blitz in 1940, leaving only the walls st ...

Stoke Common

Stoke Common is an 83.1 hectare Site of Special Scientific Interest in Stoke Poges in Buckinghamshire. It is registered common land, and it is owned by a charitable trust, with the City of London Corporation as the main funder and trustee. The si ...

West Ham Park

West Ham Park is a privately owned public park in West Ham in the London Borough of Newham. Spanning 77 acres, it is the largest park in the borough. The park has been managed by the City of London Corporation since 1874. Records from 1566 show t ...

Maria De Fleury

Maria De Fleury was a London Baptist poet, hymnist and polemicist descended from French Huguenots. Little is known of her private life. The placing of her birth at 1754 and her death at 1794 are highly uncertain.

David Williams (Archdeacon of St Davids)

David Edward Williams was the Archdeacon of St Davids from 1900 until 1920. Williams matriculated at Exeter College, Oxford in 1867, aged 19; he graduated B.A. and M.A. in 1874. He was ordained in 1877. After curacies in Carmarthen and Pembroke, ...